In Evil Hour

The setting is so relatable. The old Latin American way of life mirrors the Philippine setting. The afternoon siesta, the superstitions, the gossiping, even the shitty government. All the seemingly endless problems of the society, its poison and its disease were mentioned in the book, as well as the people's survival in a country with a tragic story. Beautifully written, this book is one of Gabriel Garcia Marquez's magnificent achievement.
The setting is so relatable. The old Latin American way of life mirrors the Philippine setting. The afternoon siesta, the superstitions, the gossiping, even the shitty government. All the seemingly endless problems of the society, its poison and its disease were mentioned in the book, as well as the people’s survival in a country with a tragic story. Beautifully written, this book is one of Gabriel Garcia Marquez’s magnificent achievement.

I have said in one of my previous posts that my eyelids have a little patience with Gabriel Garcia Marquez’s work. His One Hundred Years of Solitude gave me that massive dose of sleepiness. But that didn’t stop me from reading his other works. I’ve just finished reading In Evil Hour, and I felt like reading Bob Ong’s book in English. Having born and raised in a country whose culture has been mixed up with that of the Latin Americans and Spaniards, I can’t help but totally relate with the book’s setting and defined characters.

The Mayor. The endless promises of our politicians of peace and good governance sound so good, had all of them were fulfilled. In the story, the mayor reassured the people of a peaceful town, free of crime and violence. But once the peace he so wholeheartedly established was threatened, nothing could stop him from using his power and authority, even if it may jeopardize human rights and the lives of his men.

The priest. There’s a thin line line between the church and the state. But what’s the society’s morality standards without someone to guide it. Father Angel did his best to keep the town’s morality intact, advising the mayor what could have been done amidst the oppressing scandal. It’s not that the church is meddling with the affairs of the government. Although a clergy, the priest is also part of the society, and therefore one of its people who has the right to raise his opinion regarding state matters.

The Asis Family. Money proves to be a very powerful ally. Being one of the most prominent family in town, the Asises gained immunity from the paralyzing curfew. The mayor specifically gave orders to his men about not messing with any of the Asises, as they patrol the streets.

Pepe Amador. During the darkest of times, when an anomaly strikes and the government already takes desperate measures to put it to an end, scapegoats come in. That is, for them to appear like they are doing something about the present situation. Thus, this became the role Pepe Amador. As the boy was seen giving away some underground fliers, the authorities didn’t have a choice but to believe that this young man was responsible for all of the scandals floating around.

The barber, the dentist. They apparently represent the oppositionists, who dare to speak against the government, mark its flaws and criticize its errors. The signage in the barbershop Talking politics is not aloud, is an excellent portrayal of their veiws about the government.

The things I mentioned above were just, of course, based on my own interpretation of the novel. They are somehow a product of my fascination of the book. Needless to say, Gabriel Garcia Marquez has became one of my favorite writers.

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